Class in greenhouse
Area of Study

Agriculture Education

Overview

Agricultural education lays the groundwork for students who aspire to be teachers with well-rounded knowledge of agriculture, food, natural resources and the technology used in modern agricultural production. Graduates of agricultural education are taught to help their students develop critical communication, leadership and management skills.

Why Teach Agriculture?  Agriculture teachers inspire growth.

  • Teach by doing
  • Share their passion for agriculture
  • Create/Teach lessons that are hands-on
  • Reach students, including those who might not be successful in a traditional classroom
  • Teach about cutting-edge topics like cloning, satellite mapping, bio-fuels, and alternative energies
  • Travel in state, nationally and even internationally
  • Work with new and emerging technology from agribusiness companies

Agriculture teachers rarely experience the same day twice. One day they might be in a classroom or laboratory, while the next day they are visiting students in the field. They may spend a day preparing teams for a Future Farmers of AmericaTM Career Development Event, or leading a community service activity with an FFA Chapter.

Agricultural education teaches future educators about agriculture, food and natural resources. Through these subjects, agricultural educators teach students a wide variety of skills, including science, math, communications, leadership, management and technology.

Potential jobs for graduates with a degree in agricultural education include teaching high school agricultural science, agriculture literacy coordinator, agricultural education professor, farm business management instructor, two-year technical college agriculture instructor, adult agricultural education instructor and more.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 15 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. Both part-time and full-time postsecondary teachers are included in this projection.

    The number of people attending postsecondary institutions is expected to grow in the next decade. Students will continue to seek higher education to gain the additional education and skills necessary to meet their career goals. As more people enter colleges and universities, more postsecondary teachers will be needed to serve these additional students. Colleges and universities are likely to hire more part-time teachers to meet this demand. In all disciplines, there is expected to be a limited number of full-time nontenure and full-time tenure positions.

    However, despite expected increases in enrollment, employment growth in public colleges and universities will depend on state and local government budgets. If budgets for higher education are reduced, employment growth may be limited.

    Overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to increase, but it will vary by field. For example, employment of health specialties teachers is projected to grow 26 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. As an aging population increasingly demands healthcare services, additional postsecondary teachers are expected to be needed to help educate the workers who will provide these services.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of high school teachers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as average for all occupations. Rising student enrollment should increase demand for high school teachers, but employment growth will vary by region.

    Employment growth for public high school teachers may depend on state and local government budgets. If state and local governments experience budget deficits, school boards may lay off employees, including teachers. As a result, employment growth of high school teachers may be reduced by state and local government budget deficits. Conversely, budget surpluses at the state and local level could lead to additional employment growth for high school teachers.

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the median annual wage for postsecondary teachers was $78,470 in May 2018.

    The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the median annual wage for high school teachers was $60,320 in May 2018.