Political Science
Area of Study

Political Science

Overview

About half of all political scientists are employed by the federal government. Political scientists will continue to be needed in government to assess the impact of government.

Students who pursue a degree in political science study governments, public policies and political processes, systems, and political behavior.

Political science subfields include political theory, political philosophy, political ideology, political economy, policy studies and analysis, comparative politics, international relations, and a host of related fields.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of political scientists is projected to grow 3 percent from 2016 to 2026, slower than the average for all occupations.

About half of all political scientists are employed by the federal government. Political scientists will continue to be needed in government to assess the impact of government policies, such as the efficiencies of public services, effects of budget changes, and advantages of proposed improvements.

Political organizations, lobbying firms, and labor unions rely on the knowledge of political scientists to manage complicated legal and regulatory issues and policies. Political scientists will be needed at research and policy institutes to focus specifically on politics and political theory. Organizations that research or advocate for specific causes, such as immigration policy, healthcare, or the environment, also need political scientists to analyze policies relating to their field.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the median annual wage for political scientists was $117,570 in May 2018.